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CMG2: Victorian Furniture (1850-1880): Cabinetmaker's Guide for Dollhouse Furniture Vol. 2

<span>Victorian Furniture (1850-1880): Cabinetmaker's Guide for Dollhouse Furniture Vol. 2:</span> Victorian Furniture (1850-1880): Cabinetmaker's Guide for Dollhouse Furniture Vol. 2
Victorian Furniture (1850-1880): Cabinetmaker's Guide for Dollhouse Furniture Vol. 2
Price: $12.00

CMG2

Victorian Furniture: A Cabinetmaker's Guide to Dollhouse Furniture (Volume 2) includes the following:
 
  • RENAISSANCE BEDROOM FURNITURE: (c. 1860-1875)
    • Renaissance Night Stand, 
    • Renaissance Dresser, 
    • Renaissance Bed, 
    • Renaissance Commode
  • COTTAGE BEDROOM FURNITURE: (c.1840-1890)
    • Cottage Waterstand, 
    • Cottage Bed, 
    • Cottage Dresser , 
    • Night Stand
  • ROCOCO PARLOR SET: (1845-1870)
    • Lady's Chair, Gent's Chair, 
    • Loveseat No. 1, 
    • Loveseat No. 2, 
    • Side Chair, 
    • Parlor Table, 
    • Oval Parlor Table, 
    • Upholstered Rocker;
  • Cottage Slipper Box (c. 1870); 
  • Scroll-Bracket Corner Whatnot (c. 1860-1875); 
  • Renaissance Round End Sideboard (1860-1875); 
  • Transitional Side Chair (1840-1850); 
  • Dining Table ((c. 1840-1850)
 
All of the patterns are 1":1' (1/12th scale), although the stated measurements are in full dimension to accommodate modelers in 1/12th and 1/24th scale. Each plan includes full elevations (top, front, and side), as well as construction notes specific to each piece of furniture. As her introduction indicates, Victorian Furniture was designed for hobbyists with at least some knowledge of hand tools  and some basic skills, including how to read both elevations and exploded drawings. At the time the book was written, the dollhouse miniatures hobby, at least for builders, did not exist, so the book assumes makes a number of key assumptions: 1) that all measurement would be done with an Architect's rule,  that the available tools would come from other hobbies (model railroading, model shipbuild), and 3) 1/12th scale wood was not available.